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ICEL 2008
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Proceedings of ICEL 2008
The 3rd International Conference on e-Learning
held at the University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
26-27 June 2008

 

The proceedings for this conference are listed in the Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings (ISTP),  the Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings (ISTP/ISI Proceedings), the Index to Social Sciences & Humanities Proceedings (ISSHP) and the Index to Social Sciences & Humanities Proceedings (ISSHP/ISI Proceedings)

The proceedings of the above conference are now available to purchase in two formats, Book or CD-ROM:

UK AND EUROPE: Cost, including post and packing is £60.00

REST OF THE WORLD: Cost, including post and packing is £65.00

Cost for CD is £50, including post and packing, to UK and Europe and £55 to anywhere else in the world.


The Contents of the Proceedings are shown below.

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Paper Title

Author(s)

Guide Page

Page No.

Preface

 

vi

vi

Biographies of Conference Chairs, Programme Chair, Keynote Speaker and Mini-track Chairs

 

ix

ix

Biographies of contributing authors

 

x

x

Information and Communication Technologies Integration in Teaching: Use of a business game in a supply chain course

Nabeel Al-Qirim
UAE University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates

1

1-10

Developing Critically Thoughtful, Media-Rich Lessons in Science

Philip Balcaen
University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Canada

2

11-18

An e-Learning Model Based on Collaboration and Sharing 

Sonia Berman and Victor Katoma
University of CapeTown, South Africa

3

19-26

When the Second Language Teacher Goes Online: Changes in Professional Identity

Mads Bo-Kristensen
Resource Centre for Integration Vejle ,Denmark

4

27-32

Podcasting and its Relation with Student Performance

David Bond, Tony Holland and Peter Wells
University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

5

33-42

Ability through Mobility

Adele Botha1, Madelein van der Berg1, Jacqueline Batchelor1, Carolina Islas Sedano2
1Meraka Institute, Pretoria, South Africa
2University of Joensuu , Finland

6

43-48

An Auto-Tutor for System Identification in Control Engineering

Martin Braae
University of Cape Town, Rondebosch ,South Africa

7

49-60

Perceptions of Lecturers on the Contributions of Technology-Assisted Learning: Do They Converge Towards The University of the Future?

Izak Broere and Marlena Kruger
University of Johannesburg, South Africa

8

61-68

The Impact of South Africa’s ICT Infrastructure on Higher Education

Cheryl Brown1, Herbert Thomas2, Antoinette van der Merwe3 and Liezl van Dyk3
1University of Cape Town South Africa
2University of the Free State, South Africa
3University of Stellenbosch, South Africa

9

69-76

IM Dr Math: Using Instant Messaging in a Mathematics Tutoring Project

Laurie Butgereit
CSIR Meraka Institute ,Pretoria, South Africa

10

77-86

Teachers’ Perception of Institutional Strategies in e-Learning Implementations: A Comparative Study of an Argentinean and a Swedish University

Ines Casanovas1, Gladys Fernandez1, Stefan Hrastinski2, Christina Keller2 3 and Jorgen Lindh3
1National Technological University, Buenos Aires, Argentina
2 Uppsala University, Sweden
3Jonkoping International Business School, Jonkoping, Sweden

11

87-94

Enablers and Barriers, Intentions and use: Faculty take up of an Online Learning Environment

Glenda Cox
University of Cape Town, South Africa

12

95-102

Fish or Fowl? What is this Creature Called Educational Technology?

Laura Czerniewicz
University of Cape Town, South Africa

13

103-112

Collaborative Learning Designs for Postgraduate Writing Interventions

Andrew Deacon and Shaheeda Jaffer
University of Cape Town, South Africa

14

113-120

A Reflection on the Effectiveness of Strategies Followed to Enhance e-Learning in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Pretoria

Erika de Bruyn and Hannelie Untiedt
University of Pretoria, South Africa

15

121-132

Is the e-Learning Object “Create Interactive Accessible e-Learning” Accessible?

Anne Dickinson
Coventry University, UK

16

133-140

A Graphical and Statistical Evaluation of users’ Learning Paths in the Information System SpInSy

Christian Eder and Eva Karall
University of Vienna, Austria

17

141-150

Podcasts in Higher Education – Learning On the Move Literally

Janet Finlay, Jakki Sheridan-Ross and Andrea Gorra
Leeds Metropolitan University, UK

18

151-158

From e-Learning to m-Learning;  Practical use of the Cellphone for Teaching and Learning in the South African Classroom

Merryl Ford1 and Adele Botha2
1
Meraka Institute, Pretoria, South Africa
2University of Pretoria, South Africa

19

159-166

The Analytic-Intuition Dimension of Cognitive Style and Web-Based Learning

Martin Graff
University of Glamorgan, UK

20

167-172

Plasticity: The Online Learning Environment’s Potential to Support Varied Learning Styles and Approaches

Sue Greener
University of Brighton Business School, UK

21

173-180

Strategic Learners at a Distance

Tony Greener, Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi
University of Brighton Business School, UK

22

181-188

IT Worked for us: Online Strategies to Facilitate Learning in Large (Undergraduate) Classes

Fran Greyling
University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg South Africa

23

189-196

Learning Journal – Weblogs in Academic Courses

Stefanie Hain and Andrea Back
Institute of Information Management, St. Gallen, Switzerland

24

197-202

e-Portfolios for Academic Development: Career Progression Vehicles or Private Tools of Reflection

Stylianos Hatzipanagos and Simon Lygo-Baker
King’s College, London, UK

25

203-208

Paradox, Promise and Problem: A Social Realist View of the Potential of Open Educational Resources at the University of Cape Town

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams and Eve Gray
University of Cape Town, South Africa

26

209-216

Integrating Content-and Web-Based Instruction:  Creating HIV/AIDS Awareness in a Virtual English Classroom.

Rubeina Ismail-Allie and Linda van Ryneveld
Tshwane University of Technology South Africa

27

217-224

The eLIDA CAMEL Model of Collaborative Partnership: A Community of Practice in Design for Learning

Jill Jameson
The University of Greenwich, London, UK

28

225-232

Kusasa: Developing Analytical Thinking Skills through Peer-taught Software Programming

Barry Kayton1 and Steve Vosloo2
1
Bright Sparks, Cape Town, South Africa
2Shuttleworth Foundation, Cape Town, South Africa

29

233-240

An Online Social Constructivist Tool: A Secondary School Experience in the Developing World

Ayse Kok
Camp Rumi Technology Literacy Group, Istanbul, Turkey

30

241-248

Beyond U-tube: An Innovative use of Online Digital Video Analysis in Teacher Education

Jenny Lane and Tony Fetherston
Edith Cowan University ,Perth, Australia

31

249-254

Digital Literacies in Higher Education

Mary Lea, Robin Goodfellow and Sylvia Jones
The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK

32

255-260

Developing Web-Based Continuing Professional Development for IT Teachers of the NCS

Arno Louw
University of Johannesburg, South Africa

33

261-272

TekkiKids – Experiences in implementing technology clubs in a South African context

Mario Marais1, Marcus Duveskog2 and Nomusa Dlodlo3
1,3 CSIR, Meraka Institute, Pretoria, South Africa
2University of Joensuu, Finland

34

273-282

Leap of Faith: Effective Steps for Establishing Online Collaborative Learning Initiatives

Simon McIntyre
The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

35

283-292

An Exploration of a Distributed Community of Practice of South African Life Science Teachers

Robert McKay and Pamela Miller
University of Pretoria, Cape Town, South Africa

36

293-300

Navigating the e-Learning Terrain: Aligning Technology, Pedagogy and Context

Mandia Mentis
Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

37

301-308

Designing e-Learning Through Games – Reconceptualising the ‘fun’ and the ‘Serious’ in Computer Assisted Language Learning

Bente Meyer and Birgitte Holm Sørensen
Aarhus University, Denmark

38

309-316

Building Inclusive Libraries to Bridge the Digital Divide

Susan Moisey
Athabasca University, Alberta, Canada

393

317-322

One Lecturer’s Perspective of e-Learning Implementation in Developing Contexts

Tulimevava Mufeti
University of Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia

40

323-330

Investigating Student Use of an Anonymous Online Questioning Environment in a Large Class

Dick Ng’ambi and Irwin Brown
University of Cape Town, South Africa

41

331-336

e-Learning Adoption Conceptual Framework: The Link Between e-Learning Characteristics and Adopters Characteristics

James Njenga and Louis Fourie
University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa

42

337-346

An e-Learning Mandala Reveals how a Community of Practice is Sustained Through a Professional Development Programme

Marí Peté
Durban University of Technology, South Africa

43

347-354

Answers to Modernity: Contradictions among Learners, Teachers and Curricula with respect to e-learning?

Karen Bjerg Petersen
University of Aarhus, The Danish School of Education, Denmark

44

355-362

The Student Factor in building an e-Learning Culture: Experiences at the University of Botswana

Nduduzo Phuthi1 and  Olefile Bethuel Molwane2
1
National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
2University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana

45

363-370

The BTech Research Module for Journalism: Theoretical Aspects of Course Design in Developing Research Capacity through Blended Learning

Dee Pratt and Mikhail Peppas
Durban University of Technology, South Africa

46

371-378

Online Learning: Narratives of (Dis)location

Paul Prinsloo1, Sharon Slade2 and Fenella Galpin2
1University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
2Open University Business School ,Oxford, UK

47

379-386

E-Learning Implementation in Malaysian Universities: The Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Experience

Marlia Puteh
Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

48

387-394

Transformation of Traditional Classroom Learning Activities into Learning Objects

Osman Sadeck
The Western Cape Education Department, District Metropole South, Cape Town, South Africa

49

395-404

Interactivity with Dental Content at the University of Toronto: Second-Generation Digital Learning Applications

Florin Salajan and Greg Mount
University of Toronto, Canada

50

405-414

Merging Real Life Experiences with Technical Knowledge in a Playful Manner:  A Case in e-Inclusion

Carolina Islas Sedano1, Adele Botha2, Mario Marais2 and Erkki Sutinen1
1University of Joensuu, Finland
2CSIR Meraka Institute, Pretoria, South Africa

51

415-424

Success Indicators and Barriers to Success in Implementing Technology Enhanced Courses During a Professional Development Programme

Sibongile Simelane
Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa

52

425-432

Effective Recruitment and Selection of Online Tutors

Sharon Slade and Fenella Galpin
Open University, Milton Keyne,s UK

53

433-440

Introducing a Learning Management System in a Large First Year Class: The Impact on Lecturers and Students

Jen Snowball and Markus Mostert
Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa

54

441-448

Development of an e-Learning System Utilizing a Portable Video Game Player to Increase the Educational Level of Laboratory Training Courses in Small Group Instruction

Ken Takeuchi1, Manabu Murakami1, Atsushi Kato2, Ryuichi Akiyama3, Hirotaka Honda1, Hajime Nozawa1, and Ki-ichiro Sato1
1Tokyo University of Science, Oshamambe-cho Hokkaido, Japan
2PHD, Inc. Nakamichi-cho Hakodate-shi, Hokkaido, Japan
3Muroran Institute of Technology, Mizumoto-cho Muroran-shi Hokkaido, Japan

55

449-456

Boosting Young Children’s Writing Skills With Compensational e-Learning Designed for Dyslexics

Karin Tweddell Levinsen
University of Aarhus, Copenhagen, Denmark

56

457-464

A Data Warehouse Model for Micro-Level Decision Making in Higher Education

Liezl van Dyk
University of Stellenbosch, South Africa

57

465-474

Integrating Mobile Technology into a Distance Education Accounting Module

Annelien van Rooyen
University of South Africa Pretoria, South Africa

58

475-480

Technology-Assisted Reading for Improving Reading Skills for young South African Learners

Gerda van Wyk and Arno Louw
University of Johannesburg, South Africa

59

481-490

Integrating a Wide Variety of Student Information Sources to Support Institutional e-Learning Decisions: A Stellenbosch University Case Study

Antoinette van der Merwe and Liezl van Dyk
University of Stellenbosch, South Africa

60

491-498

 

Updated 27 June 2008

 

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